News The 10 best wireless routers of 2017

The 10 best wireless routers of 2017

By Orestis Bastounis 15 days ago Routers & storage
Browse, game and stream better with the best wireless routers

If your current router is a fossil that’s getting older by the day, you’re missing out on more than just a handful of basic hardware advancements. Not only has the 802.11ac networking standard seen widespread adoption, but pretty soon we could see speeds of up to 4.8Gbps, if 802.11ax processors have their way.

How to install custom firmware on your router

Even if those outlandish speeds are but a pipe dream compared to the 1.8Gbps peak of reality, copping the best wireless router is integral for browsing the web on a swift Wi-Fi connection. If what you’re looking for is a basic router setup, festooned by a generous helping of extras, these are our picks of the 10 best wireless routers you can buy.

Keeping in mind that we’ve undergone thorough testing of each one, read on to give your house the 802.11ac boost it so well deserves.

1. Google Wifi

The future of wireless networking gets affordable

Speed: 802.11ac 5GHz down: 101.41 Mbps, 2.4GHz down: 47.53 Mbps | Connectivity: 2 x Gigabit Ethernet ports per Wifi point (1 WAN and 1 LAN port each) | Features: AC1200 2 x 2 Wave 2 Wi-Fi, TX beamforming, Bluetooth Smart ready
$129.00
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$299.00
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Super simple setup
Great value
Limited hardware control
Lower AC rating

Gone is the seemingly distant past where we had to purchase Wi-Fi extenders in addition to our wireless routers for installation throughout the house. Wireless mesh systems are the future, and Google Wifi only reassures us of this. Though it’s not the fastest Wi-Fi mesh system to be had, Google Wifi is one of cheapest and, moreover, the easiest to configure.

It’s as easy to set up as scanning a QR code on the cylindrical unit connected to your modem via Ethernet, and a few seconds after setting the name and password of your network, you can start broadcasting. The performance is equal to or greater than the Netgear Orbi at any given moment, though Google Wifi is more about covering a wider space than exhibiting the fastest speeds.

Google Wifi also comes armed with traffic prioritization functionality, which makes sure more bandwidth is devoted to tasks which demand it, such as 4K video playback or online gaming. Sure, it requires that you buy a trio of units just to use it to its full potential, but the design of the hardware – and even the software – more than outweighs any negatives.

Read the full review: Google Wifi

2. Netgear Orbi

Wireless coverage that’s high-end, almost to a fault

Speed: 802.11ac 5GHz down: 90.14 Mbps, 2.4GHz down: 93.69 Mbps | Connectivity: 4 x 10/100/1000Mbps Gigabit Ethernet ports (1 WAN + 3 LAN for Router, 4 LAN for Satellite), 1 x USB 2.0 port | Features: 4GB flash memory, 512MB RAM, AC3000, MU-MIMO ready
$129.00
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$299.00
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Excellent coverage 
Easy setup
Mighty pricey
Finicky Wi-Fi band settings

Like Google Wi-Fi, the Netgear Orbi is a wireless mesh system more than a standard router. As such, it’s intended to give you zippy Wi-Fi coverage throughout the entire house rather than demanding that you buy an extender just to get by. Unlike Google Wi-Fi, it ships with two units rather than three: a router and a satellite, much like a cell phone signal booster.

It’s expensive, but once you get past the upper-echelon price tag, you’ll start to see why the Netgear Orbi costs so much to begin with. The matte plastic hardware units are relatively simple to configure, but not quite as straightforward as the Google Wifi. That matters very little, however, when it’s about the same procedure as just about any router you can find, albeit with one extra step.

Simply plug the router into a spare wall outlet or surge protector as well as into your modem with an Ethernet cable. Likewise, connect the satellite to an outlet and you’re already halfway there. Using the handy Sync button found on each block, naturally the two bricks will start interacting. Then just set your password and SSID in a web browser. It’s that easy.

Read full review: Netgear Orbi

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3. Starry Station

Wi-Fi made easy (and attractive)

Speed: 802.11ac: 1,300Mbps 802.11n: 450Mbps | Connectivity: 2 x Gigabit LAN port | Features: Dual-band Wi-Fi technology, 3.8-inch LCD touchscreen, embedded speaker/microphone
$274.90
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$274.90
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Elegant, simple interface
Touchscreen offers info and control
May need to rewire source
Gets noticeably loud

The Starry Station is not like most routers in its price range. Instead of chasing after the fastest speeds and longest range, it’s all about two things: convenience and aesthetic. The triangular design and curious LCD display make the Starry Station a welcome addition to your home whether it’s sitting atop your desk or on a coffee table in your living room.

Sure, it’s expensive for what it is, considering it offers little performance advantage over your ISP’s stock router, but what the Starry Station lacks it more than makes up for in style and ease-of-use. Just be sure that your source connection isn’t in, say, your closet.

Read the full review: Starry Station

4. Linksys WRT 3200 ACM

Kickin’ it old school (and open-source)

Speed: 802.11ac: 3x 867 Mbps, 802.11n: 600 Mbps | Connectivity: 4x Gigabit Ethernet, 1x USB 3.0, 1 x ESATA/USB 2.0 | Features: Tri-Stream 160, 1.8GHz dual core CPU, 512MB RAM, 256MB flash memory
Open source firmware support
Excellent features
Coverage sometimes spotty
May look more suitable in an office than a home

Effectively the antithesis to a wireless mesh like Google Wifi or the Netgear Orbi, the Linksys WRT 3200 ACM has an unflattering design that it’s damn proud of. That’s because, unlike systems that are stylish but limited when it comes to personalization, the Linksys WRT 3200 ACM gives you unadulterated control over your wireless network connections.

It may be a little more complicated to set up, but once it is, you’ll be ready to start rolling. Whether you want to toggle on and off guest connections, prioritize media devices, initiate parental controls or access the OpenVPN server, all the functionality you would expect from a router of this price is there. Not only that, but all of this is in place with the option of using whatever firmware you’d like, thanks to its open-source advocacy.

Keep in mind, however, that although the protruding antennas might imply otherwise, the Linksys WRT 3200 ACM may require signal extenders if you’re planning on using it to give a whole house Wi-Fi. Aside from that, this should be the open-source tech geek’s router of choice. The Linksys WRT 3200 favors functionality over style, and it benefits all the same.

Read the full review: Linksys WRT 3200 ACM

AVM Fritz Box 3490
5. Zyxel Armor Z2 AC2600

The gaming router your setup deserves

Speed: 802.11ac: 2,167Mbps, 802.11n: 800Mbps | Connectivity: 4x Gigabit Ethernet, 1 x WAN, 1 x USB 2.0, 1 x USB 3.0 | Features: quad-stream
$189.99
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Good MU-MIMO wireless speeds
Excellent traffic analysis software
Few current devices can use quad-stream 802.11ac
Average USB port speeds

We’ve tested the Zyxel Armor Z2 out for ourselves, and though the design makes it look like an Alienware gaming laptop, its utility is universal. Crack open the hardened, extraterrestrial case and you’ll find a 1.7GHz dual-core processor with 512GB of RAM.

Because of its zippy internal specs, the Armor Z2 can run quickly through menus and settings throughout the included web-based software interface. Though it’s expensive, the Amor Z2 is made even better by StreamBoost, which allocates higher speeds to more demanding requests, whether it’s playing games or streaming Netflix in 4K.

Read the full review: Zyxel Armor Z2 AC2600

Asus RT AC88U
6. Asus RT-AC88U

4×4 and 1024-QAM deliver the best possible wireless performance

Speed: 802.11ac: 2167Mbps 802.11n: 1000 Mbps | Connectivity: 9x Gigabit Ethernet, 1x USB 2.0 1x USB 3.0 | Features: 1024-QAM, MU-MIMO, WTFast Gamers Private Network, Asus AiProtection, AsusWRT Software
$215.99
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$269.98
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$269.98
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Fastest possible wireless speeds
Comprehensive software interface
Expensive
Requires special hardware to use fastest speeds

The Asus RT-AC88U justifies its above-average pricing with unrivalled record-breaking next-generation 802.11ac wireless performance. With four antennas and NitroQAM technology, which pushes speeds further still, this router enables wireless performance that can break the 1GB/sec limit.

There’s a minor catch – you’ll need to invest in a NitroQAM wireless adapter, such as the Asus PCE-AC88, to see those faster speeds. It’s worth it though. Coupled with comprehensive built-in software, a generous array of eight external LAN ports and 100MB/sec performance from its USB 3 port, this router is a champion, and more affordable than the Asus RT-AC5300 Tri-band gigabit router we mention above.

Netgear Nighthawk X4S VDSL ADSL Modem Router D7800
7. Netgear Nighthawk X4S VDSL/ADSL Modem Router D7800

Built-in VDSL modem and 4×4 wireless speeds make this a great all-rounder

Speed: 802.11ac: 1733Mbps, 802.11n: 800 Mbps | Connectivity: 5x Gigabit Ethernet, 2x USB 3.0, 1x eSATA | Features: VDSL 2 modem
$260.99
View at Amazon Marketplace
4×4 wireless up to 1733 Mbps for great wireless performance
VDSL 2 modem
Lacks 1024-QAM
Requires special hardware to use fastest speeds

If routers had a fashion contest, Netgear’s D7800 would be among the top contenders. Its solid black finish is complemented by a quartet of antennas. Bolstering speeds faster than a vanilla 802.11ac, this router promises an alluring 1,733Mbps over its 5GHz band and a still-remarkable 800Mbps over a 2.4GHz connection.

The Nighthawk X4S is is bettered by its inclusion of a duo of USB ports paired with an eSATA connector, thereby offering plenty of room for expanded connectivity. The real centerpiece, though, is the VDSL 2 modem built into the Nighthawk X4S D7800, negating the need to buy or lease one separately. The outfitted software isn’t too shoddy either; a simple Dynamic QOS system makes it a breeze to govern a multitude of devices on a single home network.

Linksys WRT1900ACS
8. Linksys WRT1900ACS

This bright blue box from Linksys is rather impressive

Speed: 802.11ac: 1300 Mbps, 802.11n: 600 Mbps | Connectivity: 5x Gigabit Ethernet, 1x USB 2.0, 1x USB 3.0, eSATA | Features: OpenWRT compatible, LinkSys Smart Wi-Fi support
$69.99
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$69.99
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$159.72
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Slick, comprehensive software
Great range and performance with fast USB shared storage
Lacks the nifty 4×4 antenna speeds of some routers
Relatively pricey

With three wireless streams, the Linksys WRT1900ACS is a less expensive proposition than the above quad-stream 802.11ac routers, and while it doesn’t offer the same blistering performance, it still packs performance and great software. Its internals are very powerful.

A dual-core 1.6 GHz processor and 512MB of memory drives a great-looking software interface that makes it a doddle to set up and customise a home network, with a built-in VPN, great wireless range as well as fast external connectivity via USB.

Synology Router RT1900ac
9. Synology Router RT1900ac

Synology’s first router meets high expectations

Speed: 802.11ac: 1300 Mbps, 802.11n: 600 Mbps | Connectivity: 5x Gigabit Ethernet, 1x USB 3.0, 1x USB 2.0 | Features: Synology Router Manager software
$149.99
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$149.99
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$149.99
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Familiar, spectacular software design
SD-card slot is a great idea
Only one USB port
No modem

If you’ve used a Synology NAS, you’ll be familiar with the company’s Linux-based software interface that presents a Windows-like environment, with icons, folders and so on with all the settings to configure your hardware. Synology has gone with the same software design with the Synology Router Manager on the RT1900ac, its first wireless router.

Hardware-wise it offers the same sort of thing as other 802.11ac routers, with 1300 Mbps 802.11ac and 600 Mbps 802.11n. Unsurprisingly, there’s also great support for shared storage, with well-designed iOS and Android apps to access files. Uniquely, there’s also an SD card slot joining the single USB 3 port for shared external storage.

TP Link Archer AC3200 Wireless Tri Band Gigabit Router
10. TP Link Archer AC3200 Wireless Tri-Band Gigabit Router

Six antennas for three wireless networks

Speed: 802.11ac: 2x 1300 Mbps, 802.11n: 600 Mbps | Connectivity: 5x Gigabit Ethernet, 1x USB 3.0, 1x USB 2.0 | Features: Dual 802.11ac networks, 1GHz Dual-core processor with three co-processors, Smart Connect
$199.99
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$199.99
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$199.99
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Dual wireless networks
Plenty of internal processing power
No faster for single connections than a traditional 802.11ac router
No built-in modem

The idea behind the six antennas on the Archer AC3200 is triple wireless networks for a situation where you might have dozens of computers and mobile gadgets all needing access to wireless resources.

It has two 5GHz bands supporting 802.11ac, so when a large transfer is gobbling up all the space on one channel, you can keep other devices running at full speed on the other one. It’s all done through TP-Link’s Smart Wi-Fi tech that automatically picks the most suitable frequency band to assign to your various devices based on network traffic.

The C3200 also brings a clean and simple management interface that provides the usual basic settings page alongside advanced pages for each Wi-Fi band. On the router itself you can initiate WPS, disable LED lights and switch Wi-Fi on and off.

TP Link Archer C9
10. TP-Link Archer C9

Inexpensive but powerful 802.11ac router

Speed: 802.11ac: 1300 Mbps, 802.11n: 600 Mbps | Connectivity: 5x Gigabit Ethernet, 1x USB 3.0, 1x USB 2.0 | Features: AC1900 Wi-Fi spec
$116.95
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$116.95
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$116.95
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Great value
Full range of features
Middling USB performance
Not the best range

Although the Archer C9 is relatively inexpensive, there’s very little lacking from its specification list. It supports 1300Mbps 802.11ac wireless speeds that will deliver maximum performance for just about all laptops currently on the market.

It has good software, powerful internals and a bright white, inoffensive look that wont look garish in the middle of your living room. Although the built-in modem only supports DSL, rather than VDSL 2, very little else has been left out, making this a solid value option.